Tag Archives: Christian aggression

Fact-finding report of religious demographics and their concealment in Andhra Pradesh

Fact-finding report of religious demographics and their concealment in Andhra Pradesh &  A case-study of 1 Mandal of Krishna district, AP

t has become increasingly evident over the last decade that evangelical Christian conversions have increased exponentially by leaps and bounds in the state of Andhra Pradesh. There have been drastic and alarming large-scale conversions in the state leading to social strife, law and order issues, and families being torn apart. In the last two decades, huge congregations are being held brazenly in all districts, towns and mandals to attract more converts, a big socio-religious spectacle hitherto not seen in India. It is also known that the speakers in these congregations speak against Indian religions and culture sowing the seeds of communal hatred among close-knit rural societies. New converts are refusing to cremate their departed elders, refusing to attend family ceremonies.

Disturbing evidence has come to the fore through TV debates that aggressive proselytising evangelists are sowing the seeds of secessionist, separatist ideas in the minds of converts. Loyalties of the converts are being shifted from nation to extra-territorial, extra-constitutional evangelical/ Christian religious heads located abroad. This directly affects the unity andintegrity of the country.

In view of this huge demographic and socio-political challenge in Andhra Pradesh, Legal Rights Protection Forum (LRPF) has decided to undertake a fact-finding exercise to determine the truth behind the phenomenon.    

  1. A case-study of Reddygudem mandal, Krishna District, AP

RTI applications were filed with the appropriate authorities in the year 2019 in Reddygudem mandal, Krishna district. The request was to provide the number of churches in the mandal, and the percentage of religious populations of Hindus, Christians and Muslims.  

The Mandal Tahsildar of Reddygudem mandal furnished the following data:
No. of Churches in the mandal – 68
No. of villages in the mandal – 11
Therefore, average number of churches per village –
6

Note: As per 2011 Census the number of Christians in entire Reddygudem Mandal comprising of all 11 villages is – 630

However it is to be noted that the actual number of churches on the ground are much higher, and these are not recorded in Revenue Records of the mandal. If unrecorded/ unauthorized Churches/Christian prayer-houses are added, the average number of churches would be 10 per village.

A.1.  Data from the village of Maddhulaparva, of the same Mandal Reddygudem- is as follows :

Patha maddulaparva  5 churches
Kottha maddulaparva – 3 churches, BC colony – 2 Adavi Kotturu  – 1

It is extremely intriguing that officially there are 11 Churches functional in 1 larger village, when there are NO practicing christians.  The only inference that can be drawn is that a large number of christian converts of predominantly `Hindu SC/OBC’ exist in the village? (Attached as Annexure-3)

B. Govt data of a scheme `Chandranna Christmas Kanuka’ exclusively for Christians

The state of Andhra Pradesh does not have any legislation to regulate or monitor the change from one religion to another. In the absence of any kind of mandatory provision to register change of religion, most of the conversions from Hinduism to Christianity are neither noticed nor recorded in any official records. Majority of the said conversions are out of SC Hindu population in the state. The enormity of the problem can be gauged by the fact that the word ‘SC’ and ‘Christian’ are being used interchangeably and being exploited.

To an RTI query on `selection of beneficiaries’ for the previous government’s scheme ‘Chandranna Christmas Kanuka’ exclusively for Christians, the concerned officials of Achampeta mandal, Guntur District, AP, replies dated 06.09.2019, 26.09.2019 and 05.11.2019 respectively stated that they treated the entire SC population in the aforesaid mandal as Christians and as such they extended the scheme to entire SC population, whereas it should be given only to Christians.(Annexures-1A, 1B & 1C – Attached)

C. Serious violation of Constitution- willful wrong declaration of religious status

Christian pastors own claims of Christian population in Andhra Pradesh  – In the recent years, several Christian leaders on TV debates have been claiming that about 30% of the state population is now Christian which leads to the inescapable conclusion that 28.5% of the population has wrongly declared its religion during census and a bulk of this wrongful declarations have been made by SC/OBC converts out of Hinduism into Christianity. This amounts to a serious gross criminal violation of the laws and disrespect to the Constitution of India and the entire nation.(Video Clip of the TV Debate attached as Annexure-5)

D. AP United Pastors Association

Mr. K. Rajendra Prasad, Secretary for the AP United Pastors Association in a meeting held after the 2019 Assembly Elections in Kaamayyapalem Village, Jeelugumilli (M), West Godavari (District), Andhra Pradesh, giving further proof of large-scale conversions claimed that the Pastors Association has a membership of 5 Lakhs Pastors, and that the state of AP has a total of 2Crores of Christian Population. Whereas the 2011 Census shows the total population of Christians is only 6.82 Lakhs in Undivided Andhra Pradesh. The pastors association felicitated an elected MLA, and the MLA assured that all the pastors would be provided a monthly honorarium by the newly elected AP govt.   (Attached News Clip as Annexure-4)

E. Population break-up of AP as per 2011 census

The population of Christians in Andhra Pradesh is only 6.82 Lakhs out of 4.93 Crores (State Population) which would translate to just 1.4 percent Christian population.

Source: Statistical Abstract of Andhra Pradesh – 2015 prepared by Directorate of Economics & Statistics, Government of Andhra Pradesh.
  • F.“What happened to the Christians of Andhra Pradesh?” Report prepared by Centre for Policy Studies, New Delhi

Centre for Policy Studies, New Delhi in their report titled “What happened to the Christians of Andhra Pradesh?” (report copy – Annexure-2) presented the demographic data which reveals  blatant misuse of SC reservation benefits by converted Christians. The data shows a sharp decline in those who declared their religion as Christian between 1971 and 2011.

TABLE – 1: Districts of Christian concentration in Andhra – Changes between 1971 – 2011

Data for 1 district –  Guntur: The number of Christians has reduced from 4.15 lakhs to just 0.89 lakhs in last 40 years while the population of the district went up from 28.44 lakhs to 48.87 lakhs between 1971-2011.


Table – II



The data for Guntur district is even more shocking. In 1961, 5.24% of the population was from Scheduled Castes and 13.40% was from Christians. By 2011, the figure for SCs has risen to 19.59% while the figure for Christians came down to 1.84 %. The sharp decline in number of Christians is correlated with those claiming themselves as Scheduled Castes.

G.Inferences from the data and Census

Is it not safe to assume that those practicing Christianity have obtained Hindu-SC caste certificates to garner all opportunities, facilities and schemes given for benefit of SCs – like reservations in electoral constituencies, political and nominated posts, jobs, educational opportunities, scholarships, hostels, housing etc?

As per 2011 Census, the number of Christians in the entire state of Andhra Pradesh is 6,82,660. From the year 1951 to 2011 Census, the percentage of Christians has fallen from 5.37% to 1.38%. Whereas there is an explosion in the number of Churches/Evangelical activity across the state. This shows that the constitutionally guaranteed reservations/safeguards meant for benefit of SCs are being misused by Christian converts, converted from Hindu SC/OBC.


H. Misuse of FCRA provisions?

It is also possible that the large presence of Churches, large scale receipts of FCRA funds by evangelical organizations, and the lethargy, inaction and possible complicity of Government officials treating all SCs as Christians, is a clear indication of SCs conversions into Christianity,that have taken place in the state of Andhra Pradesh.

I.Violation of Constitution

It is pertinent to note that majority of the converts from Hinduism into Christianity continue to obtain Hindu Caste Certificates like SC/OBC and garner all the benefits of reservations, whether in selection of candidates for SC reserved constituencies (MP, MLA etc.), nominated posts reserved for SCs, educational opportunities, job opportunities etc.  The genuine SCs still faithfully practicing Hindu religion and traditional/ancestral way of life and cultural practices are thoroughly deprived of their legitimate constitutionally guaranteed benefits for their social and economic upliftment. This is the gross misuse of the special facilities granted by the Constitution for SCs.


If a proper demographic exercise is conducted in the state of Andhra Pradesh, regarding the converted Christians carrying Hindu caste certificates and availing reservations and a horde of other benefits, a scam of gigantic proportions would be revealed. If this data is translated into absolute numbers of people, funds misused, and the huge time-periods of decades when this deceit is perpetuated, this may well stand-out as the largest and longest fraud on the Constitution of India as well as violations of the Law of the land. It would reveal the gross injustice that has been perpetrated against genuine and deserving SCs and could turn out to bethe biggest scam of post-independent India.





Annexure 1A
Annexure 1 B
Annexure 1C
Annexure 1D
Annexure 4

Goa Christian Inquisition was most merciless and cruel

Vasco-da-gama’s entry into Bharat in 1498 lead to the Portuguese invasion.  Vasco Da Gama tried to impress the King of Calicut with glass beads , scarlet hoods and coral.

On his second voyage in 1502 Vasco Da Gama came with 25 ships , thousands of soldiers and large canons. Enroute to Calicut they caught a pilgrim ship on passage to Mecca and burnt all 700 including women and children alive. He pounded Calicut city with his long range guns. When a messenger was sent by the king, Vasco Da Gama cut off his lips , and ears– stitched the ears of a dog in place and sent him back. King Zamorin was wary of the Portuguese and soon they shifted base to Cochin and then to Goa.

This was followed by the other European powers who went on to loot and deface Bharat for over 400+ years.  Among the 1st to come was Francis Xavier who was called “St.Xavier”. After failed attempts to persuade the Hindus to convert, he ordered the Portuguese Inquisition of Goa , which ran from 1516 to 1812.

Francis Xavier requesting Pope John III to go to Goa

Francis Xavier requesting Pope John III to go to Goa

Brutal methods used were – To tear off the tongues–  To blind the victim with sharp sticks or red-hot iron spikes– The pulling of the flesh with pliers– The skinning of the accused alive– Quartering (in which the victims intestines would be pulled from the body) and impaling, in which a stake would be hammered through the victim’s body avoiding the vital organs, resulting in a slow death that could last for hours or days. Details of the torture that Hindus were subjected to are at this link

Wheel of compassiontorture

A.K.Priolkar’s path breaking book “The Goa Inquisition” gives a detail account of the inquisition. While there have been some documents by Western writers too.

History of Goa inquisition The goa inquisition

However, the catholic church has not yet bothered to apologise for the atrocities committed by them. It is a pity that the Indian government chose to rub salt to the wounds of Hindus and celebrated 500 years of Vasco-da-gama’s so-called discovery of sea-route to India in 1998 as if it was a great event of celebration.  It is important that the new government not only gives the Hindus their due by seeking the rightful apology from the Vatican but also cut the missionary activities which even today run the business of religious conversion through fraud, deceit, cunning and coercion.

The below interview is also worth reading in this connection. 

Richard Zimler’s the author of “Guardin of Dawn documents the Portuguese Inquisition in India.  The following is his interview :

Zimler

Goa Inquisition was most merciless and cruel’

Over that period of 252 years, any man, woman, or child living in Goa could be arrested and tortured for simply whispering a prayer or keeping a small idol at home. Many Hindus — and some former Jews, as well — languished in special Inquisitional prisons, some for four, five, or six years at a time.”

Richard Zimler’s novel, Guardian of the Dawn, documents the little-known Portuguese Inquisition in India, in 16th century Goa. He points out that, apart from their laws and religion, the Portuguese also imported and enforced their infamous methods of interrogation to subdue troublemakers.

Zimler has won numerous awards for his work, including a 1994 US National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship in Fiction and 1998 Herodotus Award for best historical novel. The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon was picked as 1998 Book of the Year by British critics, while Hunting Midnight has been nominated for the 2005 IMPAC Literary Award. Together with Guardian of the Dawn, these novels comprise the ‘Sephardic Cycle’ — a group of interrelated but independent novels about different branches of a Portuguese Jewish family.

Intrigued by his novel, as well as his reasons for writing it, Senior Features Editor Lindsay Pereira decided to ask him a few questions.

You were born in New York and went on to study comparative religion. Why the decision to write about the Portuguese inquisition in Goa — a whole other world?

About 15 years ago, while doing research for my first novel, The Last Kabbalist of Lisbon, I discovered that the Portuguese exported the Inquisition to Goa in the sixteenth century, and that many Indian Hindus were tortured and burnt at the stake for continuing to practice their religion. Muslim Indians were generally murdered right away or made to flee Goan territory.

I couldn’t use that information for my novel but decided, a few years later, to do more research into that time of fundamentalist religious persecution. I discovered that historians consider the Goa Inquisition the most merciless and cruel ever developed. It was a machinery of death. A large number of Hindus were first converted and then persecuted from 1560 all the way to 1812!

Over that period of 252 years, any man, woman, or child living in Goa could be arrested and tortured for simply whispering a prayer or keeping a small idol at home. Many Hindus — and some former Jews, as well — languished in special Inquisitional prisons, some for four, five, or six years at a time.

I was horrified to learn about this, of course. And I was shocked that my friends in Portugal knew nothing about it. The Portuguese tend to think of Goa as the glorious capital of the spice trade, and they believe — erroneously — that people of different ethnic backgrounds lived there in tolerance and tranquillity. They know nothing about the terror that the Portuguese brought to India. They know nothing of how their fundamentalist religious leaders made so many suffer.

What were you trying to do with this cycle of novels? Did you set out, initially, to merely inform your audience about that period in history?

I always set out first to tell a good, captivating story. No reader is interested in a bland historical text. People want to enjoy a novel — and find beauty, mystery, cruelty, love, tenderness and poetry inside it.

Within that story, I do try to recreate the world as it once was.

In the case of Guardian of the Dawn, I want readers to feel as if they are living in Goa at that time. I want them to see the cobblestone streets of the city and the masts of ships in the harbour, to smell the coconut oil and spices in the air, to hear calls of flower-sellers in the marketplace. I want them to feel the cold shadow of the Inquisitional palace falling over their lives.

In my cycle of novels, I have written about different branches and generations of the Zarco family, a single Portuguese-Jewish family. These novels are not sequels; they can be read in any order. But I’ve tried to create a parallel universe in which readers can find subtle connections between the different books and between the different generations.

To me, this is very realistic because we all know, for instance, that there are subtle connections between what our great-grandparents did and what we are doing.

The research involved in Guardian of the Dawn is obviously immense. Could you tell me a little about the kind of preparatory work you had to put in?

To write the book, I tried to read everything I could about daily life on the west coast of India — more specifically, in and around Goa — at the end of the sixteenth century. The Internet has made that sort of research much easier than it used to be, and I was able to order books about everything from traditional medical practices — including recipes for specific ailments — to animals and plants indigenous to that region.

When I write a novel, I want to get all the details right, so this is very important. Of course, it was also vital for me to know as much as I could about Hinduism and Catholicism. As you mentioned, I studied Comparative Religion at university, so this was pretty easy. One of the main characters in the novel is a Jain, which is a religion I have always been curious about, so I read three or four books about Jainism as well. It was wonderful to be able to learn a bit about Jain belief and practice. Writing is always a great opportunity for me to keep learning.

Tiago Zarco is a character you manage to strongly empathise with. Where did he come from? Was there factual data on someone he was actually based upon?

Yes, he’s someone I really like — and for whom I feel a strong empathy. He’s a good man who is changed by his suffering and who decides to take revenge on the people who have hurt him and his family. But I did not base him on a real person. I think, in a way, he was born of my previous two novels, because I tried to make him someone who could fit into the Zarco family and yet be fully developed as an individual. With Tiago, I tried to ask the question — how far can we bend our own moral code to fight evil?

In other words, can we use deception and even violence to try to destroy a cruel system of fundamentalist religious fervour like the Inquisition?

Re-examining the Inquisition seems apt, more so at a time like this when religious fanaticism is changing the world in ways unknown to us. What do you, as an author, believe we ought to take away from a study of it? I couldn’t agree with you more, and that is one of the reasons I wrote Guardian of the Dawn. Put simply, I think we all need to be alert to the intolerance in our societies and in ourselves. We ought to maintain government and religion completely separate — such a separation is the only guarantee we have of freedom of expression. We ought to learn from the ancient Asian tradition, which is to respect the religious beliefs of others and not impose our own Gods on them.

Did you visit Goa at any point? If not, what did you base your descriptions of the state upon?

No, I decided not to go to Goa, because I didn’t want any images from modern Goa to infiltrate into the novel. I didn’t want to risk inadvertently putting something from today into it. So I based my descriptions on other areas of the world I’ve visited that have similar flora and fauna — Thailand, for instance. Also, I read all I could about the city so that my descriptions of the buildings, for instance, would be accurate. I then used my imagination, which is the most important thing for a writer. I now have a landscape in my head that is Goa — and the surrounding region — in 1600. I don’t know how it developed. It’s almost magical.

Portugal, today, is still a country deeply steeped in a Catholic tradition. Do you think people are aware of the Inquisition and what it meant back then? Would they look at this as a re-opening of old wounds?

No, few people here know anything about the Inquisition. Many of them would rather not examine what their ancestors did, both in Portugal and its colonies. But others are very curious about what they didn’t learn in school about their own history. Yes, in a sense I am opening old wounds. But I think it’s important to do that. I think that we need to face the bad things we do — both individually and as a society. In general, the Portuguese have been very receptive to my books.

Guardian of the Dawn has been a Number One bestseller here, for instance. A great many readers tell me I have opened a door to a part of their history they know nothing about. I’m proud of that. And I’m proud of having made it possible for Indians and Jews who were persecuted and imprisoned to ‘speak’ to modern readers through this novel. I think that’s important because I don’t want their suffering — and their heroism — to be forgotten.

As an author — more specifically, an author devoted to history — you have a unique perspective on the past. As a journalist, how important is examining the past to you?

As a journalist, it’s important, because I think we can change the world by exposing past injustices. By writing about atrocities, we can change policy and avoid future wars. We can get war criminals punished. We can help people win fundamental human rights. Unfortunately, so much journalism is superficial and stupid that there is little room left for important articles.

Do you plan, in future, to base your work on other periods, or religious themes? Or do you plan to break away from the genre of historical fiction?

I have written a new novel that has just come out in England called The Search for Sana, which is about two women — one Palestinian, one Israeli — who grew up in Haifa together in the 1950s. It’s about how their friendship is destroyed by political events that lead to tragedy for one of them. I am now working on a novel set in Berlin in the 1930s, in which one of the main characters will be a member of the Zarco family. So this will bring the cycle up to the 20th century. Where I will go from there is anyone’s guess

Interview Source : http://www.rediff.com/news/2005/sep/14inter1.htm