ISIS Women Believe Non-Muslim Women Are Worse Than Animals – Nadia Murad

nadia-murad-isis-survivor.jpgNadia Murad’s escape from the clutches of ISIS is bound to remain as one of the daring escapes in recent history. But, people who do not belong to Islamic groups make the classic mistake of not educating their people about what powers can do when motivated by Islam alone.

While we know that ISIS men are brutal, what is very telling is the attitude of the Muslim women too in supporting the ISIS men.

Nadia says ” None of the men who raped me revealed their identities, but one name that does stick out is Sarah.

This was the daughter of the first man who made Nadia his “sadir” or slave. The name would flash up on his mobile as he raped her. Nadia says: “I never met her or his wife, but they knew what he was doing to me. They accepted their men were raping us. To IS women, we are not worth the value of animals.”

The Yazidi women were abducted and then had to suffer, while , many Hindu girls succumb to “Love Jihad” and then go through the same horrors. “Love Jihad” is not the same as a marriage out of love, but a deliberate attempt to slight the Hindus and use Hindu girls as a tool for increasing numbers.

 

Read her Story here

Nadia Murad was eight when Tony Blair took Britain to war with Iraq, destabilising her country so badly that IS were able to rise to power and 13 years later butcher her family and take her captive to rape again and again.

After he was damned by the Chilcot Report, Blair insisted his conscience was clear and he could “look the nation in eye”.

But to get a true measure of the consequences of his actions, Blair should meet Nadia. Her eyes would tell of the bloody legacy of that decision, in the physical and mental scars she carries.

Nadia, a member of the ancient Yazidi community despised by IS, was captured in 2014 and raped so many times, by so many men, she cannot give numbers.

Getty ImagesThousands of Yezidis trapped in the Sinjar mountains as they tried to escape from Islamic State (IS) forces, are rescued by Kurdish Peshmerga forces and Peoples Protection Unit (YPG) in Mosul, Iraq
Thousands of Yezidis trapped in the Sinjar mountains as they tried to escape from Islamic State

She says: “Soon I stopped fighting them. I took myself to another world when they raped me.”

She was one of 5,000 woman kidnapped by IS in 2014 from the Yazidi, a secretive sect who derive many of their beliefs from Islam and Christianity but are wrongly labelled devil worshippers in areas near their homeland in northern Syria, northern Iraq and eastern Turkey.

Six of her brothers were slaughtered before her eyes, with 300 other men from her village. Her mother was also killed.

Nadia and her sisters, female cousins and nieces, were forced to “marry” IS extremists. None of the men who raped her revealed their identities, but one name that does stick out is, she says, “Sarah”.

Philip CoburnIraqi Yazidi woman Nadia Murad who had many members of her family (including her mother and many of her brothers and sisters) murdered by Daesh (ISIS) in Iraq
Nadia Murad wants to tell her story

This was the daughter of the first man who made Nadia his “sadir” or slave. The name would flash up on his mobile as he raped her. Nadia says: “I never met her or his wife, but they knew what he was doing to me. They accepted their men were raping us. To IS women, we are not worth the value of animals.”

Nadia escaped after three months, knowing she would be executed if caught. She says: “I preferred to be killed and just finally stop it.”

She made it out alive and has now found asylum in Germany.

REUTERSCivilian children stand next to a burnt vehicle during clashes between Iraqi security forces and al Qaeda-linked Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in Mosul
Civilian children stand next to a burnt vehicle during clashes between Iraqi security forces and al Qaeda-linked Islamic State

As we speak, she perches on her hotel bed, motionless, as she says IS extremists did to her “what a mind could not imagine”.

Nadia grew up with eight brothers and two sisters in the village of Kocho. In the summer of 2014, IS began taking nearby villages. “We knew they wanted to exterminate us,” Nadia says.

More than 50,000 Yazidis escaped to Mount Sinjar, leading to US air strikes, but Nadia and her family were trapped.

REUTERSNadia Murad Basee, a 21-year-old Iraqi woman of the Yazidi faith, speaks to members of the Security Council during a meeting at the United Nations headquarters in New York,
Nadia Murad Basee speaks to members of the Security Council during a meeting at the United Nations headquarters in New York,

The terrorists entered her village on August 3. IS told the Yazidis: “Convert to Islam or die.” Everyone was herded to the village school. “But no one agreed to convert,” says Nadia, firmly. IS took the men, including Nadia’s brothers, and the women watched through the windows as they were shot.

Nadia, whose father had already died, says: “They were using Kalashnikovs, hitting the men in the face, making them lie face down. We were screaming. The guards started beating us.”

Six of her brothers died that day. Two managed to survive. The petrified women were then split into groups – the elderly, the married, and the unmarried.

Nadia and her mother had no time to even hug as they were separated as it “all happened so suddenly”.

REUTERSA fighter of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) holds an ISIL flag and a weapon on a street in the city of Mosul
A fighter of the Islamic State

Her mother was later killed, but Nadia was taken to Mosul with 150 girls, including three young nieces, aged 15 and 17.

During the bus journey they were physically and sexually assaulted. “They laughed at us. They said, ‘You are owned by IS. You will be married to us’.”

In Mosul, Nadia, and 30 others, were taken to a small room so IS thugs could scrutinise them.

Nadia says: “Girls began vomiting and falling unconscious. My nieces were clinging to me.” Then an obese man approached Nadia.

She says: “I screamed, ‘I can’t go with you, you’re too big for me’. A smaller man was walking past and I begged him to take me.” He did, but the fat man took one of Nadia’s nieces. “If I had known…” she trails off.

Nadia was kept locked in a room to be raped by her captor and other men.

She says: “He had many guards, they came a lot. Day or night. The first time I fought, but he was strong. I couldn’t fight. They were violent, they beat me.”

In her three months of hell, Nadia was “married” to two other men. Planning her escape was what kept her going, but one attempt ended with her being caught and gang-raped by six militants.

But she was determined to flee, in part because she stopped fearing death. “I was telling the men to kill me.”

In November 2014, her captor left a door open and she ran for it. She found help and got to a refugee camp, before ending up in Stuttgart, Germany.

Her two sisters have survived and one has joined her in Germany. The third, along with her two surviving brothers, are in refugee camps in Iraq. But she says: “My 13-year-old nephew is being trained by IS to fight for them.” One niece escaped, only to die in an air strike. It has made Nadia more determined to keep telling her story until every Yazidi is free, a bravery which has earned her a nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize.

She is begging the British government to take more refugees. Nadia says: “What IS has done to the Yazidi people is genocide, the UK must offer more asylum to refugees. So many are in camps and they have been through terrible suffering.”

Her friend and translator Ahmed Burjus tells me later: “When she is travelling, Nadia is OK, but when she is at home she cries and cries. She loses her voice from crying. Being inside reminds her of her captivity.”

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